Wellesley REU

The Chemistry Department of Wellesley College is pleased to announce that
we have received funding for our summer National Science Foundation
Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) site program for the summer
of 2009. Please forward this email to interested students.

The goal of the ten-week summer program is to encourage bright young women
to pursue research careers in science and medicine through their
participation in a research project as early as possible in their academic
careers.  The key components of the program are: a student research
project supervised by a Chemistry or Physics Department faculty member;
weekly meetings in which students give oral presentations of their work;
weekly seminars by visiting scientists; field trips to nearby industrial
and academic research labs; career and graduate school panels; skills
workshops in public speaking, scientific writing, and poster
presentations; and a campus-wide poster session at the end of the program.

Wellesley's supportive infrastructure, including equipment and
facilities comparable to those at many research universities, contributes
greatly to the strength of our research programs.  The diverse array of
individual student projects involves cutting edge research such as (a)
creating novel responsive systems for investigation as drug delivery
vehicles and sensors, (b) synthesizing biologically active nucleoside and
peptide analogs, (c) preparing novel antituberculosis compounds, (d)
simulating electrorheological fluids (e) investigating the synthesis and
degradation of two nitrogen storage molecules, cyanophycin and
phycocyanin, in cyanobacteria, (f) utilizing functional MRI to examine the
brains of crustaceans such as lobsters, (g) applying Monte Carlo methods
to trial wavefunctions for strongly correlated two-dimensional systems,
(h) using solid phase peptide synthesis to prepare thioxo peptides
followed by conformational analysis utilizing two-dimensional NMR and
circular dichroism spectroscopy, (info) using laser cooling to trap Rb atoms,
(j) understanding the regulation of Endopeptidase 24.15 (thimet
oligopeptidase), an enzyme involved in neuroendocrine function, (k)
investigating the electron-induced reactions in nanoscale thin films under
ultrahigh vacuum conditions to understand the formation of biomolecules in
the interstellar medium, (l) using time-resolved laser induced
fluorescence to understand the energy transfer between Cr(VI) and U(VI),
(m) computational modeling of neural mechanisms underlying short-term
memory, and (thumbs down) investigating the vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy of
astrophysical molecules.  Undergraduate students, especially those doing
research during the summer, have co-authored most of the presentations and
papers that have come out of this department.  

In addition to the student research project component, our summer program
will build on and expand interdisciplinary connections and collaborations
between Chemistry and other departments.  The primary thrust of the
interdisciplinary focus will be the continued inclusion of physics and
geoscience faculty and students in the summer research program.  Such
collaborations will enhance student comprehension of science because of
the varied perspectives of the collaborating disciplines.

The summer research program will engage women and minority students and
introduce them to the excitement of research.  An NSF funded pilot study,
cited in a recent Science article, involving summer research students from
Wellesley and three other undergraduate institutions, clearly demonstrates
the impact of effective undergraduate research experience on learning,
attitude, and career choice.  As in the past, over 50% of the NSF-REU
slots will be reserved for non-Wellesley students with preference given to
participants from institutions with limited research opportunities.  A
distinguished faculty comprised of ~ 50% women and ~25% minorities will
serve as role models.

The point-of-contact for student recruitment will be the principal
investigator, Dr. Chris Arumainayagam, who may be reached at 781-283-3326
or via email at [ carumain@wellesley.edu ]carumain@wellesley.edu.
Details of the 2009 summer research program can be found at the following
site: [ http://www.wellesley.edu/Chemistry/insidereu.html
]http://www.wellesley.edu/Chemistry/insidereu.html

Chem Club Receives Award

1/2009 - Congratulations are in order for the Chem Club, Colby Chemistry's student affiliate chapter of the American Chemical Society.  The Chem Club recently receive a Certificate of Achievement from the American Chemical Society for the 2007-2008 academic year.  This award was presented for the Chem Club's outstanding work with outreach programs and other activities.  Congratulation on your hard work and making chemistry fun.

The Chemistry Department at Lehigh University provides undergraduate
students with unique summer research opportunities under the mentor ship
of a research-university faculty. Students in this program will be
engaged in all aspects of research aimed at the discovery and
communication of new scientific knowledge. They will gain not only
practical experience, but also the complementary perspectives of both
academic and industrial mentors on the conduct of chemical and
biochemical research.

The Chemistry Department has grown tremendously over the past 3-4 years,
with the addition of several few faculty members and significant
enhancements to the research and teaching infrastructure. Lehigh
University is committed to excellence in education at both the
undergraduate and graduate levels, as well as to the advancement of
science. As a result, our faculty mentors are highly recognized scholars
engaged in cutting-edge research aimed at publishable results.

Students in the program will conduct research over a 10-week period,
beginning in *June and ending in August.* A stipend of *$3000* will be
provided, as well as *paid campus housing*.  * The application deadline
is March 15, 2009*. You can apply online using the link below.

Apply Online <http://cas.lehigh.edu/CASWeb/Content/default.aspx?pageid=817>

The Maine INBRE Summer Research Fellowship Program has been posted through the Career Center on Colby Connect for all non-graduating Biology and Chemistry majors.  Students can search for the Employer - Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory or under the Fellowship name.  Deadline is January 23rd.  I know, short notice.  I just got the job description and they are very eager to make decisions.

Rebecca and Don Conry are pleased to announce the arrival of the newest member of the Chemistry Department, Jeremiah Cameron Conry, 8 lbs, 4 oz, 19.25 inches long, born 12:18 am December 1, 2008.


 

Congratulations to Rebecca, Don, and Jeremiah!

Students in CH145 set a campus record for the longest human salt bridge by connecting the anode and cathode of a Zn/Cu electrochemical cell with a 28-student chain.  The cell produced a potential of 1.3 volts confirming that we had no weak electrolytes in this group of students.   Our next effort will try to break the Virginia Tech record of a 180-student salt bridge.


 

IBM Lectures, Fall 2008

Nobel Laureate Robert F. Curl
Kenneth S. Pitzer-Schlumberger Professor of Natural Sciences Emeritus
Rice University, Houston, TX

Lecture I: October 16th 2008 at 7 pm in Olin 1
The Problems in Living with Technology

Over the last four to five centuries as the result of the welter of new technologies
created by the scientific revolution, a profound, irreversible change in human existence
and the planet has taken place.   For the individual in the wealthy nations, these new
technologies have been a great benefit. Imagine a life expectancy of less than forty years!
Imagine having to live without electricity! Indeed, shortly after each new major
technological advance, we can scarcely imagine life without the new thing.  However,
each new advance brings with it a downside---from the minor: forests cut down to feed
the copy machine, cell phones ringing in concerts, email in-boxes filled with spam---to
the gravely serious: nuclear proliferation, biological weapons, disease spread by rapid
transportation, the depletion of the world's fisheries, global warming, major accidents
involving technology.   For the minor problems we accommodate ourselves to downside
and are grateful for the improvement.   However, the major problems are not so tractable.
The aim of this talk is to explore these problems and why they are so difficult to solve.

Lecture II: October 17th 2008 at 3 pm in Keyes 105
A Brief History of Elemental Carbon

Carbon is the only element that humanity has routinely been in contact with in
reasonably pure form since the origin of the species. With this much experience with it,
one might think that the chemistry of pure carbon is completely understood and
developed. Nothing could be further from the real situation.  Although many important
advances have been made recently, there is much that is not understood and probably
much to be discovered about the chemistry and uses of this extremely flexible element.
This talk will be a rapid survey of human experience with elemental carbon and the
variety of forms it can take.

IBM Lectures, Fall 2008

Nobel Laureate Robert F. Curl
Kenneth S. Pitzer-Schlumberger Professor of Natural Sciences Emeritus
Rice University, Houston, TX

Lecture I: October 16th 2008 at 7 pm in Olin 1
The Problems in Living with Technology

Over the last four to five centuries as the result of the welter of new technologies
created by the scientific revolution, a profound, irreversible change in human existence
and the planet has taken place.   For the individual in the wealthy nations, these new
technologies have been a great benefit. Imagine a life expectancy of less than forty years!
Imagine having to live without electricity! Indeed, shortly after each new major
technological advance, we can scarcely imagine life without the new thing.  However,
each new advance brings with it a downside---from the minor: forests cut down to feed
the copy machine, cell phones ringing in concerts, email in-boxes filled with spam---to
the gravely serious: nuclear proliferation, biological weapons, disease spread by rapid
transportation, the depletion of the world's fisheries, global warming, major accidents
involving technology.   For the minor problems we accommodate ourselves to downside
and are grateful for the improvement.   However, the major problems are not so tractable.
The aim of this talk is to explore these problems and why they are so difficult to solve.

Lecture II: October 17th 2008 at 3 pm in Keyes 105
A Brief History of Elemental Carbon

Carbon is the only element that humanity has routinely been in contact with in
reasonably pure form since the origin of the species. With this much experience with it,
one might think that the chemistry of pure carbon is completely understood and
developed. Nothing could be further from the real situation.  Although many important
advances have been made recently, there is much that is not understood and probably
much to be discovered about the chemistry and uses of this extremely flexible element.
This talk will be a rapid survey of human experience with elemental carbon and the
variety of forms it can take.

Teaching Jobs

Sean Stubblefield will be on-campus at Colby College holding an informational session teaching jobs on Wednesday October 15th at 7:00 pm in Lovejoy 208 and conducting interviews on October 16th through the Career Service Office.
 
Carney, Sandoe & Associates is an educational recruitment firm that places teachers and administrators in private, independent and like-kind (charter, magnet, pilot and merit) schools across the nation and worldwide. We have placed over 23,500 teachers and administrators since 1977.

Learn About the Semester in Environmental Science (SES) in Woods Hole, MA
A Fall Semester 2009 Off-Campus Program offering field and lab training in ecosystems-ecology and biogeochemistry sponsored by The Marine Biological Laboratory.

Information Session and Pizza
Thursday October 9th
5:00 to 6:00 PM
In Lovejoy 205

Hosted by
Stephanie Oleksyk
SES Recruitment Coordinator

Dartmouth Engineering

On Tuesday, September 30, Eric Hansen from Dartmouth will visiting Colby to answer questions about the Dartmouth dual degree engineering program and, in particular, to discuss how it is appropriate for Colby students with a variety of majors.  Prof. Hanson will be available to answer student questions during a drop-in session in Keyes 104 from 9-11:30 AM.

"The Physics of Molecular Self-Assembly on Surfaces - An Exploration of the Nano-World That Will Build Itself"

Professor Karsten Pohl
Physics Department
University of New Hampshire

3:00 p.m. Keyes 105
(Refreshments at 2:30 in Mudd 323)

Dear ACS Member,

The staff at ACS Careers is working hard to create new added value programs to you our members. I would like to make you aware of several of our new services:

ACS Careers Industry Forum:
Monthly Teleconferences featuring Luminaries in the Chemical Sciences

The Department of Career Management and Development and Industry Programs are launching a Monthly Teleconference featuring Luminaries in the Chemical Sciences. The first teleconference is scheduled for September 11th from 2 to 3 pm EST.

We feel this is a great opportunity for practitioners in the chemical sciences to listen in to top industry leaders in their industries and will assist in making informed career decisions. Guest speakers include:

September:    Dr. Abou-Gharbi - Senior Vice President & Head of Chemical & Screening Sciences, for Wyeth Drug Discovery & Development.
October:    Carolyn Ribes - Process Analytical, Dow Benelux, B.V., Terneuzen, The Netherlands.
November:    Michael Strem, Ph.D. - President, Strem Chemicals, Inc. founded Strem Chemicals in Newburyport, MA.
December:    No teleconference to be scheduled.
January:    Tom Lane, ACS President-elect.
February:    Dr. William F. Carroll, Jr. - Vice President, Chlorovinyl Issues for OxyChem and works on public policy issues and communications related to chlorine and PVC. He is also Adjunct Professor of Chemistry at Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana where he teaches polymer chemistry.
Please join us to discuss economic and employment trends with top industry executives in the chemical sciences. Go to register now.

This is a free service via conference call. Check us out for future new and innovative career services programs. We want to hear from you.

The Colby Chemistry Club welcomes all majors, minors, and students interested in chemistry to join students and faculty in a welcome back to school BBQ in front of Keyes 105 at 5 PM on Friday, 9/12/2008.   Signup sheets will be posted on the second floor of Keyes.   Please contact Zac Helm (zrhelm@colby.edu) for more details.

Professors Thamattoor and King received Waterville Board of Education Community Awards for their support of educational programs in the local schools.   Professor Dasan Thamattoor was recognized for providing an innovative, hands-on science program for 1st and 2nd grade students.   Professor Whitney King was recognized for his support Waterville High School's Science Olympiad Team.